Lymphedema Treatment

Lymphedema Educational Info

If you have questions about Lymphedema – what causes it, a simple explanation in the form of an analogy, and the nitty gritty of the anatomy and physiology behind it, check out the
Lymphedema Educational Information page.

Lymphedema Resources

If you are looking to find more information about lymphedema such as other websites, books, or what kind of compression stockings to get, click on the Lymphedema Resources Page.

Recover Faster. 
Feel Better Today.

Pain & Swelling Solutions
135 Madison St NE   Albuquerque
Shannon Goins, Certified Lymphedema Therapist - Pain & Swelling Solutions, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Certified Cupping Therapist
Shannon Goins
Certified Lymphedema Therapist
Terapeuta linfática certificada

Recuperarse más rápido.
Sentirse mejor hoy.

Doy la bienvenida a los clientes que hablan español.

Si habla usted español, por favor envíeme un mensaje de texto o correo electrónico en español.

No hablo mucho español, pero estoy aprendiendo.

Puedo comunicarme contigo usando el traductor de google. Muchos de mis clientes no hablan inglés y no tengo problemas para comunicarme con ellos.

Recover Faster. 
Feel Better Today.

Shannon Goins, Certified Lymphedema Therapist - Pain & Swelling Solutions, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Certified Cupping Therapist
Shannon Goins
Certified Lymphedema Therapist
Terapeuta linfática certificada

Recuperarse más rápido.
Sentirse mejor hoy.

Doy la bienvenida a los clientes
que hablan español.

Si no habla inglés, envíeme un mensaje de texto o correo electrónico en español.

¡No hablo mucho español, pero estoy aprendiendo!

Puedo comunicarme contigo usando el traductor de google. Muchos de mis clientes no hablan inglés y no tengo problemas para comunicarme con ellos.

Pain & Swelling Solutions
135 Madison St NE   Albuquerque

Lymphedema Treatment

Lymphedema Therapy Albuquerque

Advanced Lymphedema is treated by Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT) of which Electro-Lymphatic Therapy (ELT) and/or Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) are a part.

Pain & Swelling Solutions offers treatment for Lymphedema.  Book your appointment today.

Compression Bandaging

As part of Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT), compression bandaging is applied to the affected area.  

Compression Bandaging for Lymphedema Albuquerque

Bandaging helps:

  • Keep fluid from returning to the area
  • Assists the lymphatic system in pumping fluid out of the affected area as the body moves
  • Breaks up hard (fibrotic) tissues, making the area softer.

If a person is able to use Electro-Lymphatic Drainage (ELT), the necessity for compression bandaging is often minimized.

Exercises for Lymphedema

Part of Lymphedema management is the use of exercise to get fluid moving.   This is best done under the care of a Physical or Occupational Therapist who is also a Certified Lymphedema Therapist.  In general, exercise should never be suddenly strenuous because that could cause further inflammation and swelling.

Exercise that begins with simple movements and gently progresses to more challenging resistance and weight use is ideal.  For detailed guidelines, please see the video below put out by Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center.  These guidelines apply to all people with Lymphedema, not just people who have or have had cancer that caused the Lymphedema.

Exercises should always be done while wearing compression garments or bandages. 

Compression Garments

Lymphedema is managed long-term (following Complete Decongestive Therapy) by wearing specially fitted compression garments.  

compression garment fitting for lymphedema Albuquerque

Dietary Modifications for Lymphedema

Did you know that what you eat can influence your Lymphedema? 

In the following video, “Eating to Starve Lymphedema & Lipedema” presented at the Lymphatic Education & Research Network (LE&RN) Patient Symposium in 2019, Chuck Ehrlich, MS, MBA  discusses how to make dietary modifications to help both Lymphedema and Lipedema.

 

Infections and Lymphedema

The protein-rich fluid that is stuck between the cells in lymphedema is the perfect medium to grow bacteria.  Any time infection is suspected when you have lymphedema, it demands immediate attention as these infections can be dangerous.  The most common infections with lymphedema are cellulitis and erysipelas.  Erysipelas is more superficial than cellulitis, but they are both usually treated the same way.  Knowing the difference is not important.

It is important to always clean any cuts or abrasions that you may get on an area of the body affected by lymphedema. Keep a very close eye on the area for signs of infection until it is fully healed. Note that infections can happen in lymphedema without an open wound.

What follows are general guidelines regarding infections and lymphedema.  They are not a substitute for medical advice and are intended only to present common scenarios for general educational purposes.  Always consult with a medical professional when making decisions if you suspect you have an infection.

Watch for these signs:

  • Skin that feels warm or hot
  • Redness or rash
  • Fever of 100 degrees or more

Should the area become red and start to spread slowly, see your doctor or go to urgent care.  You will likely be prescribed oral antibiotics.  Once on antibiotics the symptoms should stop worsening after 2 days and begin to improve gradually after 3 days.  Pain, itching, and heat will likely go away first, but the redness can persist and take significantly longer to go away.  If your symptoms are still getting worse on the third day, check in with the doctor for a follow-up.

On the other hand, if the red area quickly becomes very hot, painful, and is rapidly spreading through the limb, go to the ER – especially if you have a fever.  This may be a medical emergency that would require IV antibiotics and careful monitoring by medical professionals. 

Some doctors advise taking antibiotics prophylactically if you get a cut and have a history of recurrent infections, but this is certainly not without its own risks.  You should discuss the pros and cons of this with your doctor.

It is important to forego any lymphatic drainage if you have an active infection as it can worsen the infection and possibly cause a life-threatening crisis.  Once the infection is well controlled with antibiotics – commonly 3-5 days after starting the antibiotics – it is generally safe to proceed with lymphatic work.  Again, this timing is a general scenario.  You should check with your doctor to ensure it is safe to resume lymphatic therapy.

Video on the Signs and Symptoms of Lymphedema and Infection

info about lymphedema Albuquerque

How to Get Help for Lymphedema

Make an appointment with Pain & Swelling Solutions and learn all about Lymphedema and how to manage it while you get your treatment.

Check out our Resources Page to find out what books and organizations we recommend for further information.

Visit our Educational Info Page where you can find detailed information about Lymphedema and how it happens.

How to Get Help for Lymphedema

Make an appointment with Pain & Swelling Solutions and learn all about Lymphedema and how to manage it while you get your treatment.

info about lymphedema Albuquerque

Check out our Resources Page to find out what books and organizations we recommend for further information.

Visit our Educational Info Page where you can find detailed information about Lymphedema and how it happens.